Calendar


Spring 2013

January

M 1/28 "Settting the Stage"
Our Tasks
• Please explore the course web site concentrating on the syllabus, assignments and the calendar.
• Please read "Ought Science Be Planned? Two Opposing Views" (PDF; 391 KB) (J.D. Bernal and Michael Polanyi, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1949.)
• Please read "The Normative Structure of Science" (PDF; 4.9 MB) (Robert Merton, from The Sociology of Science, 1973.)
• Please read the Introduction (pgs. vii-ix) and Chapter 1 (pgs. 1-28) in Stephen Turner's Explaining the Normative.

Background:
"Social Norms" (The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy).
"The Social Dimensions of Scientific Knowledge".
John Desmond Bernal: Wikipedia Entry.
John Desmond Bernal Prize.
Michael Polanyi (1891-1976) (Mary Jo Nye).

Our Goals
• To introduce ourselves. To examine course requirements and procedures with an emphasis on course goals. We will consider the framework for our course. Finally, we being defining and exploring normativity.



February

M 2/4 "Hume's Guillotine Meets Normative Sociology"
Our Tasks
• Please read the Concept Narrative, Essays and Exams, and Question Formation assignments.
• Please review Sections 1, 10, 11 and 12 in Chapter 1 (PDF; 155 KB) (from G. E. Moore's Principia Ethica.)
• Please review "The Gap Between 'Is' and 'Should'" (PDF; 340 KB) (Max Black, The Philosophical Review, Vol. 73, No. 2 Apr., 1964, pp. 165-181.)
• Please read "Chapter 1: The Strong Programme in the Sociology of Knowledge" (PDF; 70 KB) from Knowledge and Social Imagery (David Bloor, 1976.)
• Please read "Why Science Studies Has Never Been Critical of Science: Some Recent Lessons on How to Be a Helpful Nuisance and a Harmless Radical" (PDF; 110 KB) (Steve Fuller, Philosophy of the Social Sciences, Vol. 30 No. 1, March 2000.)
• Please read "Dismantling Boundaries in Science and Technology Studies" (PDF; 161 KB) (Peter Dear and Sheila Jasanoff, Isis, Vol. 101, No. 4, 2010.)

Background:
A Treatise of Human Nature, Book III, Part I, Section I, David Hume.
"Philosophy Bro: Is-Ought Problem".
Hume's Moral Philosophy: Is and ought, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
"How to Derive 'Ought' From 'Is'" (John R. Searle, The Philosophical Review, Vol. 73, No. 1, 1964)

Our Goals
• To become familiar with the is-ought problem and naturalistic fallacy. To take up issues regarding the method and composition of STS.

M 2/11 "Defining Science and Its Social Problems"
Our Tasks
• Please read the Introduction to the Transaction Edition, Preface, Introduction (pgs. ix-5) and Chapters 1-5 (pgs. 11-180) in Jerome Ravetz's Scientific Knowledge and its Social Problems.

Background:
Jerome Ravetz

Our Goals
To explore the normative social structure of scientific inquiry.

M 2/18 "Facts of a Certain Sort"
E-mail regarding your approach to essays and exams assignment is due to me by midnight. Meetings and discussions about your essay will take place during the remainder of the week.
• Please read Chapters 6-10 (pgs. 181-288) in Jerome Ravetz's Scientific Knowledge and its Social Problems.
• Please read the article selected from developing the Concept Narrative.
Our Goals
• To examine the character of scientific facts. To orient ourselves with regard to the concept narrative.

M 2/25 "Assessing Fields of Inquiry"
• Please read Chapters 11-the Conclusion (pgs. 289-436) in Jerome Ravetz's Scientific Knowledge and its Social Problems.

• Team 1 Members: Please post your questions on the reading to the Question 2 Forum on our Wiki by 6 p.m. on Thursday (2/21) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Team 1 Members: Please post your Keywords on the proper forum on our Wiki by 6 p.m. on Thursday (2/21) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Respondents: Please post your response to selected questions to the Question 2 Forum on our Wiki by noon on Sunday (2/24) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Class Members: Please provide your assessment of the presentation within 24 hours (by 2/26) of the end of class (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Team 1 Members: Please post your Synthesis to the proper forum on the wiki within 48 hours (by 2/27) of the end of class (for reference the Question Formation assignment).

Our Goals
To discuss responses to the questions posed by the team.



March

M 3/4 "Technological Values"
If you selcted the Exam option, questions are due to me by noon on Friday, March 8.
• Please read the Foreword and Preface (pgs. ix-xxv) and Chapters 1-3 (pgs. 5-61) in Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience.
• Please read the article selected from developing the Concept Narrative.

Background:
Dr. Andrew Feenberg: Ten Paradoxes of Technology

Our Goals
To examine the political power of technology.

Spring Break

M 3/18 "Social Choices"
Essay due to the Wiki by midnight. Exam due, as arranged, on March 19, 20 or 21.
• Please read Chapters 4-6 (pgs. 63-124) in Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience.
Our Goals
To analyzes cases supporting a critical theory of technology.

M 3/25 "Reconsidering Rationality"
• Please read Chapters 7-9 and the Afterword (pgs. 128-226) in Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience.

• Team 2 Members: Please post your questions on the reading to the Question 3 Forum on our Wiki by 6 p.m. on Thursday (3/21) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Team 2 Members: Please post your Keywords on the proper forum on our Wiki by 6 p.m. on Thursday (3/21) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Respondents: Please post your response to selected questions to the Question 3 Forum on our Wiki by noon on Sunday (3/24) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Class Members: Please provide your assessment of the presentation within 24 hours (by 3/26) of the end of class (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Team 2 Members: Please post your Synthesis to the proper forum on the wiki within 48 hours (by 3/27) of the end of class (for reference the Question Formation assignment).

Our Goals
To discuss responses to the questions posed by the team.



April

M 4/1 "Science, Social Science and Law"
• Please read "Normative Reflexions on Constructivist Approaches to Science and Technology" (PDF; 3.5 MB) (Hans Radder, Social Studies of Science, Vol. 22, 1992)
• Please read the Chapters 2-3 (pgs. 29-94) in Stephen Turner's Explaining the Normative.
• Please read the article selected from developing the Concept Narrative.
Our Goals
To take up the gap between normative facts and nonnormative explanations.

M 4/8 "Other Forms of Normativity"
• Please read the Chapters 4-6 (pgs. 95-205) in Stephen Turner's Explaining the Normative.

• Team 3 Members: Please post your questions on the reading to the Question 3 Forum on our Wiki by 6 p.m. on Thursday (4/4) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Team 3 Members: Please post your Keywords on the proper forum on our Wiki by 6 p.m. on Thursday (4/4) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Respondents: Please post your response to selected questions to the Question 3 Forum on our Wiki by noon on Sunday (4/7) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Class Members: Please provide your assessment of the presentation within 24 hours (by 4/9) of the end of class (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Team 3 Members: Please post your Synthesis to the proper forum on the wiki within 48 hours (by 4/10) of the end of class (for reference the Question Formation assignment).

Our Goals
To discuss responses to the questions posed by the team.

M 4/15 "A Life in STS"
• Please read the Introduction and Chapter II (pgs. 1-44) in Steve Fuller's The Philosophy of Science and Technology Studies.
• Please read the Introduction (PDF; 5.7 MB) and Chapter 1 (PDF; 6.4 MB) in Steve Fuller's Social Epistemology.
• Please read the article selected from developing the Concept Narrative.
Our Goals
To consider: What is, or ought to be, a life in STS?

M 4/22 "Ethnography and Normativity"
• Please read Chapters III and IV (pgs. 45-113) in Steve Fuller's The Philosophy of Science and Technology Studies.
• Please read Chapter 4 (PDF; 5.9 MB) in Steve Fuller's Social Epistemology.

• Team 4 Members: Please post your questions on the reading to the Question 4 Forum on our Wiki by 6 p.m. on Thursday (4/18) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Team 4 Members: Please post your Keywords on the proper forum on our Wiki by 6 p.m. on Thursday (4/18) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Respondents: Please post your response to selected questions to the Question 4 Forum on our Wiki by noon on Sunday (2/24) (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Class Members: Please provide your assessment of the presentation within 24 hours (by 4/23) of the end of class (for reference the Question Formation assignment).
• Team 4 Members: Please post your Synthesis to the proper forum on the wiki within 48 hours (by 4/24) of the end of class (for reference the Question Formation assignment).

Our Goals
To discuss responses to the questions posed by the team.

M 4/29 "A New Science?"
• Please read Chapters V and VI (pgs. 115-179) in Steve Fuller's The Philosophy of Science and Technology Studies.
• Please read Chapter 7 (PDF; 4.9 MB) and Chapter 8 (PDF; 5.1 MB) in Steve Fuller's Social Epistemology.
• Please read the article selected from developing the Concept Narrative.
Our Goals
To address the possibilities for re-enchanting science.



May

M 5/6 "Normativity and Authoritarianism"
Concept Narrative and documentation due.
• Please read Chapter 11 (PDF; 4.6 MB) and Chapter 12 (PDF; 3.6 MB) in Steve Fuller's Social Epistemology.
Our Goals
To consider the place of normativity in our work.

S 5/11 "Final"
• Please post the Essay to the Wiki by no later than 3:05 p.m. Exam due, as arranged, on May 9, 10 or 11.

Well Done!

Norms in STS